MEET OUR BEAUTIFUL RESCUES WHO HAVE BEEN GIVEN A SECOND CHANCE IN LIFE 

 
 
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Lazarus

One of our volunteers spotted this underweight, discouraged, gentle soul on a Facebook horse auction site and knew she’d have to rescue him. She immediately spoke with Erin late in the evening the night before Thanksgiving. At 11 p.m. she sent out a Facebook message to a group of 15 friends, who showed up early on Thanksgiving morning to clean a field area near a stall, build a turnout in which to quarantine Lazarus while he got used to his new home, and confirmed his transport from the horse auction. He’s now gained weight, is in a herd in another turnout and is loved and cherished by all of the BCHR volunteers, who give thanks to him and to all of the rescues every day.

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RAIN & MASON

Miniature horses Mason and Rain were up for auction with no takers. They huddled together in a small, dirty, crowded pen with other abandoned horses waiting to be sold at a New Jersey horse auction facility. Horses who are not bought at auction are often sent to Mexico or to Canada for slaughter, as this practice is illegal in the United States. The adoption price to bail out horses who are not auctioned must exceed the price that slaughterhouse meat buyers would pay for each horse. 

BCHR Volunteer Amy McCambridge Steppe spotted a photo of a sweet brown and white mini (Mason) on the NJ horse auction website and was haunted by his sad, blue eyes. She traveled to the auction house and personally financed the fee to bail out Mason. Several days later BCHR President Erin Giannios and her father drove the large BCHR horse trailer to the auction house to pick up Mason and once they set eyes on his pal Rain, who wouldn’t leave his side, brought her home, as well. Now the two wander the farm and visit the other horses to share their hay.

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Jack

Our sweet mule Jack arrived at the Rescue from a farm that was forced to close and disperse its animals due to financial hardship. The owner contacted us and asked if we could take him. Jack now lives comfortably and happily among his equine pals in a large turnout. The lone mule at the Rescue, Jack is like the lovable little brother to all of the other horses. Jack is a 12-year-old mule and stands at 10 hands.

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LUNA

Three years ago a horse dealer's trailer broke down by the farm. The driver asked if we could keep his horses in our stalls overnight until his trailer was repaired. Alas, the owner fixed his trailer and drove off with his horses. Several days later, however, BCHR volunteers discovered  Luna in one of the stalls—the owner had secretly dropped her off at the rescue! He then contacted Erin to keep Luna, and she readily agreed, as Luna’s her next stop was to a kill pen, because she was elderly and had back and hip issues. This all transpired even before BCHR became a horse rescue. Fortunately Luna now has a permanent home at BCHR and grazes contentedly with the mares Saturn and Phoenix.

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Patches

Patches is a majestic American Paint horse who arrived at the rescue after being abandoned by his owner. As borders at Mahrapo Farms, both Patches and Bailey developed an instant attachment to Erin. She covered their veterinary bills and expenses and they thrived under her expert care. Sadly, Bailey passed away at 32 years old. He was one of the original rescues and his beautiful spirit still inspires the many volunteers at the Rescue.

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OSCAR

BCHR founder Erin Giannios tells the story best about how sweet Oscar arrived at his new home from a nearby horse auction:

I was drawn to him…something in his eyes, his face, his presence. I knew his deadline was up and that he’d be sent to slaughter the very next day, and I got an overwhelming feeling that I had to save him. He was simply abandoned. There was nothing wrong with him and I saw this. As soon as I walked into his stall he knew he would be okay. And so did I. I knew rescuing him was right.

The day Oscar walked off of the trailer and into his new home at the farm he looked around, SAW at the group of volunteers who rescued him, and immediately decided he belonged HERE. He now shares a turnout with his pal Papichulo and they spend their days trotting around the fence together, sharing flakes of hay and enjoying constant hugs, kisses and attention from the BCHR volunteers.

 
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GoldIE

Goldie, a docile, lovable 43-year old Palomino, is the patriarch of the BCHR. Goldie was scheduled to be euthanized because his owner couldn't pay for his upkeep. Sadly, he was left in a field with no human contact for over three years. However, since arriving at the rescue and receiving much love and tender care from our volunteers, Goldie now happily roams the many green pastures at the farm and is rarely seen without his dear pal Summer, a chunky miniature palomino.

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LEO

Leo arrived in the U.S. from Mexico, living first at local farm before coming to the Rescue. Saucy, spirited yet patient and loving, Leo has established himself as the unofficial leader of the herd of horses in his field, including Friendly, Emsy, Remy, Skippy, Patches and Jack, the mule. Leo has a deep and unique connection with special-needs children, and he’s always the first to run to the fence to greet visitors to the farm.

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Papi chulo

Papichulo, a curious, sweet tempered Appaloosa who is blind in one eye, was abandoned by his owner and was living temporarily at another boarding facility. The facility’s owner was in debt and was planned send Papi and several other horses to auction to earn some extra cash. Fortunately the BCHR heard Papi’s story and rescued him before he was sent to auction where, if he wasn’t sold, might have been sent to slaughter. Plans are underway to help Papi receive a procedure to help maintain the sight in his good eye. 

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PANDA

Panda, an American Paint/draft cross, came at the rescue from a New Jersey farm. His previous owner there had rescued him from an Amish farm in Pennsylvania. At first, Panda was very apprehensive and afraid of close human contact. However, with much patience and love received from the many BCHR volunteers who spoke softly to him and fed him countless carrots, he now appears comfortable and content with visitors and also with Dusty, Jesse James and Vegas, who roam the wide, grassy field with him on the southern side of the farm.

 
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Did you know that you can make specific donations to help these rescue horses? All funds go toward purchasing feed and hay, along with other necessary expenses directly related to our rescue horses' care. Your donation can help save a horse's life! Be sure to click donate now and join the many horse lovers who help the BCHR continue its compelling rescue efforts.

 
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EMSY

Emsy came from a thoroughbred breeding facility many years ago, but was considered too small and too slow to race. Over the years, several people have cared for him but without any consistency. Because of this, he's one of our permanent residents and is loved by everyone at the rescue, especially his friend Friendly, who never seems to leave his side.

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SATURN & JUPITER

These chestnut beauties arrived on a cold, blustery day in March from Tar Heel, N.C., the day after a fierce blizzard. Warily, Saturn cautiously stepped from her trailer, Jupiter close at her side. Within an hour the two were interacting with our volunteers, eating apples and carrots. Now Jupiter shares a turnout with Olive and the two have become fast friends.

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Friendly

Friendly is one of our original residents at the farm. He is a handsome chestnut and is loved by everyone at the rescue, especially his friend Emsywho never seems to leave his side.

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PHOENIX & OLIVE

This regal jet-black mare and her foal were adopted from a New Jersey horse auction after Erin was contacted by a horse  advocate seeking their rescue. At that time there were six pairs of mommas and babies that were dropped off at auction. Fortunately the other pairs were rescued, and Phoenix and Olive were the last to be adopted. Buyers were hesitant to adopt them as they were considered completely feral. However, now Saturn and Phoenix roam a large, grassy turnout next to the creek, and Jupiter and Olive share a turnout across from a large herd in front of the farm.